The best-known interrelated mechanisms through which coloration can act to reduce predator detection rates of potential prey are background matching and disruptive coloration (Thayer 1909; Cott 1940; Kingsland 1978; Ruxton et al. 2004; Wilkinson & Sherratt 2008; Stevens & Merilaita 2009). With background matching, objects are difficult to detect simply due to their similarity to their background. Conversely, the striking/high-contrast markings involved in disruptive coloration create ‘the appearance of false edges and boundaries and hinders the detection or recognition of an object's outline and shape’ (Stevens & Merilaita 2009). Coloration is but one means through which animals achieve crypsis; others include behaviour and morphology, including body size and shape. Here we focus on behaviour and its interaction with coloration in relation to crypsis.

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Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511852053.007
Citation
Webster, R.J. (Richard J.), Callahan, A. (Alison), Godin, J.-G.J, & Sherratt, T. (2011). Camouflage behaviour and body orientation on backgrounds containing directional patterns. In Animal Camouflage: Mechanisms and Function (pp. 101–117). doi:10.1017/CBO9780511852053.007