History computer games have become an economic and cultural phenomenon, and historians should seize the opportunity to participate in their development. Players of history games are interested in the past and in the big questions that drive historical scholarship. In this way, games have the potential to draw players into the discipline if we can discover the best way to express history though simulation. But what research do we draw on as we study how to accomplish this transformation? This essay is the product of a meeting of historians, educators, and gamers who joined previously separate lines of inquiry to identify literature and models that we believe form the foundation for developing a theory of good history through gaming.

Additional Metadata
Keywords computer games, history teaching, learning
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.3138/chr.90.2.303
Journal Canadian Historical Review
Citation
Kee, K. (Kevin), Graham, S, Dunae, P. (Pat), Lutz, J. (John), Large, A. (Andrew), Blondeau, M. (Michel), & Clare, M. (Mike). (2009). Towards a theory of good history through gaming. Canadian Historical Review (Vol. 90, pp. 303–326). doi:10.3138/chr.90.2.303