This study represents a preliminary step towards developing an understanding of how telework arrangements affect intra-organizational communication. The following general research questions are addressed: (1) Do telework arrangements change the way in which teleworkers communicate with their superiors, their subordinates, their colleagues and their clients?; and (2) Do telework arrangements change the way in which managers communicate with subordinates who telework? The study, which was conducted at two Canadian federal government departments, was designed to collect information from four groups: (1) teleworkers (n = 36 at Time 2); (2) managers of teleworkers (n = 28 at Time 2); (3) co-workers of teleworkers (n = 27 at Time 2); and (4) a control group (n = 25 at Time 2). Three data collection techniques were used in this study: paper and pencil questionnaires, telephone interviews, and focus group interviews. Data were collected at three points in time: (1) two weeks prior to the start of the telework pilot; (2) three months after the telework pilot had begun; and (3) six months after the start of the telework pilot. Analysis of the data suggests that, with a few important exceptions, part-time telework arrangements have little impact on intra-organizational communication.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Communication, Longitudinal research, Quasi-experiment, Telecommuting
Journal Journal of Engineering and Technology Management - JET-M
Citation
Duxbury, L, & Neufeld, D. (Derrick). (1999). An empirical evaluation of the impacts of telecommuting on intra-organizational communication. Journal of Engineering and Technology Management - JET-M (Vol. 16, pp. 1–28).