Transportation of dangerous goods (DG) represents an important portion of the overall transport of freight in the world. Ground transport (excluding pipelines) moves approximately 21% to 31% of the total tonnage of DG in Canada. Accidents involving DG might occur at any time, at any location along transport routes or within storage areas and they not only affect people and the environment but also have a great impact on the national economy. This paper presents the details of experimental investigation studying the blast attenuation capability of suppressive shield panels (SSP). Moreover, the performance of one type out of four designed suppressive shield panels (SSPs) using a numerical approach to verify an experimental study. The technology can be used for the storage, processing and transport of explosive materials, or can also be applied to protecting attractive targets and infrastructure that is deemed vulnerable to explosive attacks, including those attacks accompanied by the threat of fragment bombs. Various configurations of commercially-available steel angles were assembled as SSPs and were evaluated for their capability to attenuate blast pressure from detonating Pentolite charges. Results obtained from the experimental tests of 0.5 kg charges indicated that the SSPs attenuate the blast pressure to values in the range of 40% to 60%. The results of this research can be extended to include the design and construction of SSPs for transportation of DG by sea as well. Effectively, this can include the strengthening of current standard containers.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Blast pressure, Explosive materials, Pressure attenuation, Suppressive shield panels, Transportation of dangerous goods
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12198-009-0024-5
Journal Journal of Transportation Security
Citation
Elshafey, M.M. (M. M.), Halim, A.O, Isgor, O.B. (O. B.), Contestabile, E. (E.), & Katsabanis, T. (T.). (2009). Numerical and experimental investigations for safer transportation of dangerous goods. Journal of Transportation Security, 2(1-2), 13–27. doi:10.1007/s12198-009-0024-5