Conventional rolling equipment, while capable of achieving a specified density, results in construction induced cracks, often visually apparent, and these are due to a mismatch between the geometry and relative rigidity of the roller and the asphalt mix. This led to the design and construction of a new compactor, the Asphalt Multi Integrated Roller (AMIR). In effect it replaces the cylindrical shape with a moving flat plate and results in a crack free asphalt layer and more uniform compaction along and across the mat while achieving the same if not better density with less passes than conventional rolling. A number of integrated field trials and laboratory experiments have recently been carried out at the National Research Council of Canada and other sites. Extensive testing of cores, beams and slabs provided data on density, voids, etc., plus tensile strength, stripping and fatigue resistance. This paper first briefly describes the concept and development work for the AMIR compactor. It then describes, in more detail, comparative test results performed on asphalt specimens from conventional and AMIR compacted sections. These results show quite significant improvements in strength, and fatigue life for the AMIR compacted specimens.

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Conference Proceedings of the 17th ARRB Conference. Part 1 (of 7)
Citation
Halim, A.O, Haas, Ralph (Ralph), & Svec, O.J. (O. J.). (1994). Improved asphalt pavement performance through a new method of compaction. In Proceedings - Conference of the Australian Road Research Board (pp. 175–191).