Bone allograft material is treated with sterilization methods to prevent the transmission of diseases from the donor to the recipient. The effect of some of these treatments on the integrity of the bone is unknown. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of several sterilization methods on the mechanical behaviour of human middle ear bones. Due to the size and composition of the bones (approximately 1.5 mm diameter by 4 mm long), mechanical testing options were limited to the traditional platens compression test. Experiments were first performed with synthetic bone to evaluate the precision of this test applied to small specimens. Following this, fresh frozen human ossicles were thawed and sterilized with (i) 1 N NaOH (n = 12); (ii) 0.9% LpH, a phenolic solution (n = 12); or (iii) steam at 134°C (n = 18). A group of 26 control specimens did not receive any sterilization treatment. Material and structural properties were determined from axial compression testing. Results from the synthetic bone showed that the test was reproducible, with standard deviations less than 20% of the means. Significant differences occurred in stiffness and ultimate force values between NaOH-treated and autoclaved bones when compared to normals (p < 0.05), but ont for LpH-treated bones. LpH is not approved for medical use, so NaOH is the most appropriate of the treatments studied for the sterilization of ossicle allografts.Bone allograft material is treated with sterilization methods to prevent the transmission of diseases from the donor to the recipient. The effect of some of these treatments on the integrity of the bone is unknown. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of several sterilization methods on the mechanical behaviour of human middle ear bones. Due to the size and composition of the bones (approximately 1.5 mm diameter by 4 mm long), mechanical testing options were limited to the traditional platens compression test. Experiments were first performed with synthetic bone to evaluate the precision of this test applied to small specimens. Following this, fresh frozen human ossicles were thawed and sterilized with (i) 1 N NaOH (n = 12); (ii) 0.9% LpH, a phenolic solution (n = 12); or (iii) steam at 134 °C (n = 18). A group of 26 control specimens did not receive any sterilization treatment. Material and structural properties were determined from axial compression testing. Results from the synthetic bone showed that the test was reproducible, with standard deviations less than 20% of the means. Significant differences occurred in stiffness and ultimate force values between NaOH-treated and autoclaved bones when compared to normals (p<0.05), but not for LpH-treated bones. LpH is not approved for medical use, so NaOH is the most appropriate of the treatments studied for the sterilization of ossicle allografts.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Allograft, Mechanical properties, Sterilization
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0021-9290(99)00012-3
Journal Journal of Biomechanics
Citation
Speirs, A, Hotz, M.A. (M. A.), Oxland, T.R. (T. R.), Häusler, R. (R.), & Nolte, L.-P. (L. P.). (1999). Biomechanical properties of sterilized human auditory ossicles. Journal of Biomechanics, 32(5), 485–491. doi:10.1016/S0021-9290(99)00012-3