Primary objective: Repetition-lag memory training was developed to increase individuals’ use of recollection as opposed to familiarity in recognition memory. The goals of this study were to examine the feasibility of repetition-lag training in patients with chronic stroke and to explore whether the training might show suggestions of transfer to non-trained tasks. Research design: Quasi-experimental. Methods and procedures: Patients (n = 17) took part in six repetition-lag training sessions and their gains on the training and non-trained tasks were compared to those of age-matched healthy controls (n = 30). Main outcomes and results: All but two patients completed the training, indicating that the method is feasible with a wide range of patients with stroke. The amount patients gained on the training task was similar to that of healthy controls (that is, the Group × Time interactions were by-and-large not significant), suggesting that patients with stroke might benefit to the same degree as healthy adults from this training. Both groups showed some indication of transfer to the non-trained backward digit span task and visuospatial memory. Conclusions: These findings show that repetition-lag memory training is a possible approach with patients with stroke to enhance recollection. Further research on the method’s efficacy and effectiveness is warranted.

Additional Metadata
Keywords familiarity, memory, recollection, rehabilitation, Stroke
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1080/02699052.2016.1222081
Journal Brain Injury
Citation
Stamenova, V. (Vessela), Jennings, J.M. (Janine M.), Cook, S.P. (Shaun P.), Gao, F. (Fuqiang), Walker, L.A.S, Smith, A.M. (Andra M.), & Davidson, P.S.R. (Patrick S. R.). (2017). Repetition-lag memory training is feasible in patients with chronic stroke, including those with memory problems. Brain Injury, 31(1), 57–67. doi:10.1080/02699052.2016.1222081