Health Canada is the lead department for coordinating the federal response to a Canadian nuclear emergency event. The framework to manage a radiological consequence is outlined in the Federal Nuclear Emergency Plan (FNEP). In 2014, a full scale exercise (FSX) was held to test the capacity of the federal government to handle a nuclear facility emergency disaster in Canada. The FSX provided a means to demonstrate the integration of various departments and agencies in response to such an event, and although a number of task teams within FNEP were tested, the capacity to monitor humans for exposure post-event was not played out fully. To address this, a table top exercise (TTX) was held in 2015 that brought together experts from human monitoring groups (HMGs) in partnership with Provincial and Municipal emergency response organizations. The TTX took the form of a facilitated discussion centered around two types of radiological/nuclear (RN) emergency scenarios that commenced post-release. The purpose of the exercise was to integrate these communities and identify knowledge gaps in policies and concepts of operations pertaining to the human monitoring aspects of RN events including biodosimetry, bioassay, portal monitors, whole body counting, and the provision of personal dosimetry. It also tested the interoperability between first responders/receivers and Federal, Provincial, and Municipal emergency response organizations. The end outcome was the identification of clear knowledge gaps in existing and newly developed concepts of operation in the human population monitoring response to an RN emergency in Canada; these and possible recommendations are captured in this report.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Accidents, Emergencies, Emergency planning, Nuclear, Operational topics, radiological
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1097/HP.0000000000000678
Journal Health Physics
Citation
Chauhan, V. (Vinita), Duncan, D. (Devin), & Wilkins, R.C. (2017). Radiological/nuclear human monitoring tabletop exercise: Recommendations and lessons identified. Health Physics, 112(6), 580–586. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000678