Toxicity tests of chemicals have mainly focused on the partial life-cycle evaluation of model animals. Limited information is available for the evaluation of effects of chemicals from a whole-life-stage exposure perspective. The objective of this study was to perform a whole-life-stage characterization in the basic biology of Daphnia magna (D. magna) and evaluate the effects of a known organophosphate ester (OPE) contaminant, tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP), on growth, reproduction, survival, and transcription of genes. The whole-life-stage characterization in growth, reproduction, and survival of D. magna was conducted, and representative sampling time points for the three developmental stages were identified (day 6, day 32, and day 62). Transcriptomic profiles for these three stages were compared, and stage-specific PCR arrays of D. magna were developed. The whole-life-stage exposure to environmentally relevant or greater concentrations of TDCIPP significantly inhibited growth and reproduction of D. magna and decreased survival at the later stage of the exposure experiment (≥32 days). Such adverse effects were not observed in the early stage of the exposure (<32 days), suggesting that short-term toxicity tests, such as the standard 21-day test, might underestimate the environmental risk of TDCIPP. Furthermore, expressions of genes selected at day 6, day 32, and day 62 were significantly changed after TDCIPP exposure, and the changes in the expressions of partial genes were correlated to the inhibitory effects on growth, reproduction, and survival.

Additional Metadata
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.7b04569
Journal Environmental Science and Technology
Citation
Li, H. (Han), Yuan, S. (Siliang), Su, G. (Guanyong), Li, M. (Meng), Wang, Q. (Qiangwei), Zhu, G. (Guonian), … Liu, C. (Chunsheng). (2017). Whole-Life-Stage Characterization in the Basic Biology of Daphnia magna and Effects of TDCIPP on Growth, Reproduction, Survival, and Transcription of Genes. Environmental Science and Technology, 51(23), 13967–13975. doi:10.1021/acs.est.7b04569