High-precision TIMS U-series dates and continuous stable oxygen and carbon isotope profiles of a 4000 year stalagmite record from Rana, northern Norway, are presented and compared with data from two other speleothems from the same cave. The dating results yield ages from 3875 ± 34 to 296 ± 3 years before AD2000, with 2σ errors from 0.5 to 1%. The overall growth rate is 35 mm/ka, corresponding to a temporal resolution of 29 years/mm. The stalagmite is tested for isotopic equilibrium conditions, where all 'Hendy' tests, except one, indicate isotopic equilibrium or quasi equilibrium deposition. Both the stable oxygen and carbon isotope records reveal a strong and abrupt enrichment in the near-top measurements. This corresponds in time to the opening of a second cave entrance in the late 1960s, which caused changes in the cave air circulation. The stable oxygen isotope signal is enriched compared to the modern value over the last 300 years, indicating a negative response to temperature changes. Likewise, the stable carbon isotope record is enriched in this period. However, both of the stable isotope records are shown to be significantly enriched compared to the isotope ranges displayed by other stalagmites in the same cave, and this questions the reliability of the proxy records derived from the presented stalagmite. Still, a general good correspondence of large scale fluctuations is found between the three stable oxygen isotope records from this cave. The stable carbon isotope records show large variations within the cave and are believed to be governed by soil-zone conditions, percolation pathways and possibly driprates.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Holocene, Norway, Paleoclimate, Speleothems, Stable isotopes, TIMS
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0031-0182(00)00225-X
Journal Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
Citation
Linge, H., Lauritzen, S.-E., Lundberg, J, & Berstad, I.M. (2001). Stable isotope stratigraphy of Holocene speleothems: Examples from a cave system in Rana, northern Norway. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 167(3-4), 209–224. doi:10.1016/S0031-0182(00)00225-X