This study examined Chinese kindergarten pre-service teachers' beliefs about hypothetical children's problematic behaviors with peers. Pre-service teachers responded to depictions of children displaying social withdrawal (shyness and unsociability) and physical aggression (for comparison). Among the results, pre-service teachers perceived aggression as the most problematic behavior, followed by shyness and then unsociability. Results suggested that pre-service teachers in later years of the program were able to make fine-grained distinctions between subtypes of social withdrawal. Our research lends support to the notion that pre-service teachers' beliefs may be susceptible to change. Results are discussed in terms of pedagogical development and cultural context.

Additional Metadata
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2018.02.004
Journal Teaching and Teacher Education
Citation
Li, Y. (Yan), Archbell, K.A. (Kristen A.), Bullock, A. (Amanda), Wang, Y. (Yingjie), & Coplan, R. (2018). Chinese pre-service teachers' beliefs about hypothetical children's social withdrawal and aggression: Comparisons across years of teacher education. Teaching and Teacher Education, 71, 366–375. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2018.02.004