In recent years, energy policy has been increasingly linked to concepts of sustainable development. In this timely collection, editor G. Bruce Doern presents an overview of Canadian energy policy, gathering together the top Canadian scholars in the field in an examination of the twenty-year period broadly benchmarked by energy liberalization and free trade in the mid-1980s, and by Canada’s ratification of the Kyoto Protocol in 2002. The contributors examine issues including electricity restructuring in the wake of the August 2003 blackout, the implications of the Bush Administration’s energy policies, energy security, northern pipelines and Aboriginal energy issues, provincial changes in energy policy, and overall federal-provincial changes in regulatory governance. They also demonstrate that, since per capita energy usage has actually increased in the past several years, sustainable development remains very much a struggle rather than an achievement. When the Kyoto Protocol and its requirements for reductions in greenhouse gas emissions are factored in, the Canadian record is especially dubious in basic energy terms. Canadian Energy Policy and the Struggle for Sustainable Development is key to understanding many of the issues in Canada’s endeavour to live up to its energy-related environmental responsibilities.

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Doern, G.B. (2004). Canadian energy policy and the struggle for sustainable development. Canadian Energy Policy and the Struggle for Sustainable Development, 1–341.