This study investigates body esteem factors (weight-esteem and appearance-esteem) as mediators of the relationship between 'internalization of the ideal body figure' and disordered eating behaviors (restrained, emotional and external eating) in a community sample of adolescent males (n = 810) and females (n = 1137) from the Ontario Research on Eating and Adolescent Lifestyles (REAL) study. Mediation models were examined using a bootstrapping approach to test indirect effects and indirect contrasts. In males, weight-esteem partially mediated the relationship between muscular ideal and restrained eating; appearance-esteem partially mediated effects in the emotional and external eating regressions. In females, both weight-esteem and appearance-esteem partially mediated the relationship between thin ideal and all three forms of disordered eating; weight-esteem was a stronger mediator for restrained eating, and appearance-esteem a stronger mediator for emotional and external eating. Body esteem is important to consider for prevention and treatment of disordered eating in both genders.

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doi.org/10.1016/j.bodyim.2011.07.007
Body Image
Department of Psychology

Flament, M.F. (Martine F.), Hill, E.M. (Erin M.), Buchholz, A. (Annick), Henderson, K, Tasca, G.A. (Giorgio A.), & Goldfield, G. (Gary). (2012). Internalization of the thin and muscular body ideal and disordered eating in adolescence: The mediation effects of body esteem. Body Image, 9(1), 68–75. doi:10.1016/j.bodyim.2011.07.007