This article addresses a theoretical and methodological intervention in support of inclusion for girls with disabilities in Vietnam. Drawing on an internationally collaborative project, Monitoring Educational Rights for Girls with Disabilities in Vietnamese schools, we critically engage the politics of inclusion and exclusion of girls with disabilities in education. Using a critical methodological framework that foregrounds the lived experiences of 21 girls with disabilities in Vietnam, we ask how we might strengthen participatory knowledge production through the work of monitoring rights in order to inform practices and policies related to disability and education. Through a preliminary analysis of the visual data emerging from our participatory visual methodologies, we demonstrate how these methods can contribute to constructing more inclusive practices and policies for girls with disabilities in both the Vietnamese and the global contexts.

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Keywords education, girls with disabilities, participatory visual methodologies, rights, Vietnam
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1080/09687599.2015.1051515
Journal Disability and Society
Citation
Nguyen, X.T, Mitchell, C. (Claudia), de Lange, N. (Naydene), & Fritsch, K. (Kelly). (2015). Engaging girls with disabilities in Vietnam: making their voices count. Disability and Society, 30(5), 773–787. doi:10.1080/09687599.2015.1051515