This article looks at framing strategies behind the recent Canadian Conservative government’s rhetoric on the military. Critics argue that Conservative rhetoric has politicised Canadian history and overemphasised the armed forces. Few scholars, however, have looked at the specific forms this rhetoric took and the strategies it suggested. The article presents the results of a systematic analysis of Conservative rhetoric between 2005 and 2015. It argues that three key frame alignment strategies were at the heart of the Conservative Government’s rhetoric: extension, consolidation and transformation, with truly transformative rhetoric transpiring only in the last phase. While agreeing with critics that this emphasis on the military aimed to alter perceptions of Canadian identity, the article shows that Conservative rhetoric was far from and monolithic.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Canada, Conservative, framing, government, identity, military, partisan politics
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1080/14662043.2016.1175691
Journal Commonwealth and Comparative Politics
Citation
Desrosiers, M.-E. (Marie-Eve), & Lagassé, P. (2016). Military frames and Canada’s Conservative government: from extending to transforming perceptions of Canadian identity. Commonwealth and Comparative Politics, 54(3), 288–311. doi:10.1080/14662043.2016.1175691