Background This study quantifies differences in life expectancy between residents of Inuit Nunangat and people in the rest of Canada; estimates the contribution of specific causes of death to the differences; and examines these differences over time, by sex and by age group. Data and methods A geographic approach was used to decompose differences in life expectancy for residents of Inuit Nunangat, compared with people living outside this geographic area. Differences in life expectancy by cause, sex, and age group were calculated using the discrete method of decomposition and were applied to abridged life tables. Causes of death were classified according to Global Burden of Disease categories. Attributable causes of death were calculated for causes amenable to medical intervention and for smoking-related diseases. Results The largest contributor to life expectancy differences between males in Inuit Nunangat and the rest of Canada was injury, particularly selfinflicted injury at ages 15 to 24. For females, the largest contributors were malignant neoplasm and respiratory disease at ages 65 to 79. Interpretation The gap in life expectancy between residents of Inuit Nunangat and the rest of Canada can be attributed to specific groups of causes occurring within specific age ranges.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Aboriginal, Cause of death, Death rate, Indigenous, Longevity, Mortality
Journal Health Reports
Citation
Peters, P. (2013). An age- and cause-decomposition of differences in life expectancy between residents of Inuit Nunangat and residents of the rest of Canada, 1989 to 2008. Health Reports, 24(12), 3–9.