Administrative datasets often lack information about individual characteristics such as Aboriginal identity and income. However, these datasets frequently contain individual-level geographic information (such as postal codes). This paper explains the methodology for creating Geozones, which are area-based thresholds of population characteristics derived from census data, which can be used in the analysis of social or economic differences in health and health service utilization. With aggregate 2006 Census information at the Dissemination Area level, population concentration and exposure for characteristics of interest are analysed using threshold tables and concentration curves. Examples are presented for the Aboriginal population and for income gradients. The patterns of concentration of First Nations people, Métis, and Inuit differ from those of non-Aboriginal people and between urban and rural areas. The spatial patterns of concentration and exposure by income gradients also differ. The Geozones method is a relatively easy way of identifying areas with lower and higher concentrations of subgroups. Because it is ecological-based, Geozones has the inherent strengths and weaknesses of this approach.

Additional Metadata
Journal Health reports / Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Health Information = Rapports sur la santé / Statistique Canada, Centre canadien d'information sur la santé
Citation
Peters, P, Oliver, L.N. (Lisa N), & Carrière, G.M. (Gisèle M). (2012). Geozones: an area-based method for analysis of health outcomes. Health reports / Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Health Information = Rapports sur la santé / Statistique Canada, Centre canadien d'information sur la santé, 23(1), 55–64.