In this essay: I provide a brief history of habitat fragmentation research; I describe why its “non-questions” (‘Is habitat fragmentation a big problem for wildlife species?” and, “Are the effects of habitat fragmentation generally negative or positive?”) are important to conservation; I outline my role in tackling these questions; I discuss reasons why the culture of habitat fragmentation research is largely incapable of accepting the answers; and I speculate on the future of habitat fragmentation research.

Additional Metadata
Keywords habitat fragmentation, habitat loss, landscape complementation, landscape heterogeneity, number of patches, patch size, SLOSS, spatial scale, species conservation, Ursula Franklin
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1111/geb.12839
Journal Global Ecology and Biogeography
Citation
Fahrig, L. (2018). Habitat fragmentation: A long and tangled tale. Global Ecology and Biogeography. doi:10.1111/geb.12839