This article discusses the ethical and methodological issues associated with boredom experienced by human participants during psychological experiments. Ways are suggested in which informed consent, briefing, and debriefing can be used to prevent or remedy boredom induced during experiments. We address methodological and ethical concerns, and we discuss the advantages of the proposed approach for experimenters' practice and training of undergraduate students. Future directions for much needed research on these topics are also emphasized.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Boredom, Debriefing, Ethical guidelines, Human participants, Inconvenience, Informed consent
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1207/S15327019EB1202_4
Journal Ethics and Behavior
Citation
D'Angiulli, A, & LeBeau, L.S. (Lavonia Smith). (2002). On boredom and experimentation in humans. Ethics and Behavior, 12(2), 167–176. doi:10.1207/S15327019EB1202_4