In making decisions that affect their fitness, individual animals may use skills and knowledge acquired from others instead of depending solely on their own personal experiences. Many species of fish are known to acquire and use social (public) information to make decisions in a number of behavioral contexts. In doing so, fishes exhibit both social learning and behavioral traditions. However, our understanding of the conditions that favor social over asocial learning in fishes remains limited. Here, I summarize the empirical evidence for social learning in fishes and discuss some of the behavioral contexts and environmental circumstances that favor social learning, as well as its evolutionary implications.

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Keywords Antipredator behavior, Copying behavior, Eavesdropping, Fish, Foraging, Habitat choice, Mate choice, Migration, Public information, Schooling, Shoaling, Social learning
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-813251-7.00059-6
Citation
Godin, J.-G.J. (2019). Fish social learning. In Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior (pp. 345–349). doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-813251-7.00059-6