Using data collected from a survey administered at seven mine sites in Uganda, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Rwanda, this paper examines differences in the livelihoods and economic well-being of women and men involved in artisanal and small-scale mining. To provide a deeper context, the results from the survey are combined with findings from other methodological approaches. The results provide evidence that men have more experience in the mining sector and that men earn more both at mine sites and at activities not conducted at mine sites. The evidence also highlights the need for research on the artisanal mining sector to be gender sensitive, to yield policies that improve the economic well-being of all those reliant on the sector.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Artisanal small-scale mining, economic well-being, gender, livelihoods, work
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1080/00083968.2019.1689831
Journal Canadian Journal of African Studies
Citation
Stewart, J, Kibombo, R. (Richard), & Rankin, L.P. (2020). Gendered livelihoods in the artisanal mining sector in the Great Lakes Region. Canadian Journal of African Studies. doi:10.1080/00083968.2019.1689831