In the mid-1990s, unprecedented interventions by private companies specializing in the delivery of military muscle and know-how began altering the dynamics of local conflicts. Since then, private military and security companies have transformed the dynamics of local security delivery around the world, most prominently in Iraq and Afghanistan. In the process, the private military industry has generated plenty of profit and attention, both alarmist and analytical. Two totems of research into the burgeoning industry and its implications are Corporate Warriors by P.W. Singer and The Market for Force by Deborah Avant. Nearly a decade after their publication, these books remain among the most in-depth and sustained treatments of the industry. This essay looks back at the arguments presented in each book and their influence on subsequent research on military privatization.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Afghanistan, control, Iraq, Military privatization, private military firms, state, United States
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1177/0020702014542754
Journal International Journal
Citation
Ettinger, A. (2014). After the gold rush: Corporate Warriors and the Market for Force revisited. International Journal (Vol. 69, pp. 559–569). doi:10.1177/0020702014542754