In Drosophila melanogaster, lifespan and fitness traits were investigated as a function of mating status. Four mating protocols were used: virgin males and females, males and females allowed to copulate only once; males and females that had multiple copulations with one partner over the 5-day mating period; and polygamous males and females that had multiple copulations with different partners over the 5-day mating period. Virgin females had the longest lifespan, and polygamous females had the shortest lifespan, potentially due to injuries, infections or exposure to toxic accessory gland products obtained from different males. Reduced lifespan was also observed in males mated to multiple females. Unexpectedly, mating decreased the amount of food eaten by flies. Mating to different partners decreased the amount of fat in both sexes. The number of eggs laid and their quality was increased in females mated to multiple males. Mating status influenced superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (PX) activities, as well as the content of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The mRNA levels of the insulin receptor (InR) gene were significantly increased in the polygamously mated female group compared to the virgin group. Levels of dTOR mRNA were lower in polygamous females. These results indicate that insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) and Drosophila target of rapamycin (dTOR) pathways can mediate the link between mating status and longevity in Drosophila.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Antioxidant enzymes, Drosophila melanogaster, Longevity, Longevity-associated genes, Mating
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2020.110716
Journal Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - A Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Citation
Koliada, A. (Alexander), Gavrilyuk, K. (Katarina), Burdylyuk, N. (Nadia), Strilbytska, O. (Olha), Storey, K, Kuharskii, V. (Vitaliy), … Vaiserman, A. (Alexander). (2020). Mating status affects Drosophila lifespan, metabolism and antioxidant system. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - A Molecular and Integrative Physiology, 246. doi:10.1016/j.cbpa.2020.110716