In this paper, I distinguish two often-conflated theses-the thesis that all dispositions are intrinsic properties and the thesis that the causal bases of all dispositions are intrinsic properties-and argue that the falsity of the former does not entail the falsity of the latter. In particular, I argue that extrinsic dispositions are a counterexample to first thesis but not necessarily to the second thesis, because an extrinsic disposition does not need to include any extrinsic property in its causal basis. I conclude by drawing some general lessons about the nature of dispositions and their relation to their causal bases.