This article examines an entrepreneurial criminology of mass political violencewithin the broader set of criminological communications on this theme, and identifies some troubling dimensions of the criminological closures on which the enterprise rests. The criminological enterprise over mass political violence testifies to ambitions of external expansion at the expense of other social scientific analyses, that are represented as ill-qualified for the study of this particular object, while evacuating from its conception of criminology intellectual traditions averse to the promotion of criminalization as a means to constitute and respond to troubling events. The normative values advanced in enterprising calls seem to have led to a failure to submit certain assumptions to rigorous intellectual (and political) critique. The result is an analytic conservatism that, perhaps unwittingly, reinforces dominant assumptions about crime, as well as an uncritical adoption of liberal internationalism and western cultural dominance.

Additional Metadata
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10611-013-9452-z
Journal Crime, Law and Social Change
Citation
Carrier, N, & Park, A. (2013). On an entrepreneurial criminology of mass political violence. Crime, Law and Social Change, 60(3), 297–317. doi:10.1007/s10611-013-9452-z