Uncertainty from occupant-related matters is typically shrugged off by building designers as beyond their control. However, evidence suggests that careful attention of designers can help prevent occupants from behaving in energy-intensive ways; not by policing their behaviour, but by improving comfort. This paper examines the concept of bidirectional robust design - an attempt to design systems to be as resistant as possible to the noise of inputs - as an objective. Rather than modify occupant behaviour, which has shown only modest success, robust design strives to improve buildings to cope with diverse weather conditions and occupant behaviour. An example with fixed and movable shading demonstrates that lighting energy use can be significantly reduced in both absolute and certainty terms, if designed properly. Finally, some robust building design approaches are discussed. Copyright

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Conference 13th Conference of the International Building Performance Simulation Association, BS 2013
Citation
O'Brien, W. (2013). Occupant-proof buildings: Can we design buildings that are robust against occupant behaviour?. Presented at the 13th Conference of the International Building Performance Simulation Association, BS 2013.