How have photographs contributed to visualizing the "imagined community" of Canada? In what ways does the dissemination of photographs in the media and through exhibitions shape our understanding of the past? How have photographs been used to reanimate the past through memory work? The Cultural Work of Photography in Canada is an in-depth study on the use of photographic imagery in Canada from the late nineteenth century to the present. This volume of fourteen essays provides a thought-provoking discussion of the role photography has played in representing Canadian identities. In essays that draw on a diversity of photographic forms, from the snapshot and advertising image to works of photographic art, contributors present a variety of critical approaches to photography studies, examining themes ranging from photography's part in the formation of the geographic imaginary to Aboriginal self-identity and notions of citizenship. The volume explores the work of photographs as tools of self and collective expression while rejecting any claim to a definitive, singular telling of photography's history. Reflecting the rich interdisciplinarity of contemporary photography studies, The Cultural Work of Photography in Canada is essential reading for anyone interested in Canadian visual culture.

Additional Metadata
Publisher McGill-Queen's University Press
Editor C. Payne (Carol) , Kunard, A. (Andrea)
ISBN 978-0-7735-3861-0
Citation
Payne, C, & Kunard, A. (Andrea) (Eds.). (2011). The Cultural Work of Photography in Canada.