The present report is an overview of six studies that share a common theme: What is the contribution of shared reading to child outcomes. The first three studies are experimental in nature and show that the number of times as well as the manner in which the adult reads to the child will affect children's acquisition of comprehension and spoken vocabulary. The fourth study is an intervention with children who have poor vocabulary skills. The findings revealed that care givers can enhance children's spoken vocabulary by reading books to them in an interactive manner, but that simply reading in their customary fashion may not promote vocabulary acquisition. Finally, the last two studies are correlation in nature. They provide converging evidence that shared reading predicts children's vocabulary, and that, children's vocabulary is a robust predictor of reading comprehension. These latter studies also show the limits of shared reading because parent reports of shared reading did not predict children's early literacy skills or word reading at the end of grade 1.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Literacy skills, Reading comprehension, Storybook reading, Vocabulary acquisition
Journal L1 Educational Studies in Language and Literature
Citation
Sénéchal, M. (2006). Reading books to young children: What it does and doesn't do. L1 Educational Studies in Language and Literature, 6(3), 23–35.