We investigate how gender harassment affects the romantic relationships (i.e., romantic relationship adjustment and romantic relationship efficacy) of female targets (spillover effects) and their romantic partners (crossover effects), and what role targets' anger in response to their gender harassment plays in these relationships. We explored these questions using two US samples. Sample 1 comprised 206 females, all of whom provided data on their gender harassment experiences, feelings of anger, and romantic relationship functioning. Sample 2 consisted of 60 romantic dyads. Females once again provided data on their gender harassment experiences and feelings of anger; their romantic partners reported on their own romantic relationship functioning. Full support emerged for hypothesized spillover effects: supervisor gender harassment indirectly and negatively influenced targets' romantic relationship adjustment and romantic relationship efficacy through target anger (Sample 1). Full support also emerged for hypothesized crossover effects: supervisor gender harassment indirectly and negatively influenced the romantic relationship adjustment and romantic relationship efficacy of targets' romantic partners through target anger (Sample 2). Implications for theory, research, and practice are considered.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Crossover, Gender harassment, Sex-based harassment, Spillover, Work-family
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1002/job.1969
Journal Journal of Organizational Behavior
Citation
Dionisi, A, & Barling, J. (Julian). (2015). Spillover and crossover of sex-based harassment from work to home: Supervisor gender harassment affects romantic relationship functioning via targets' anger. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 36(2), 196–215. doi:10.1002/job.1969